Limited time, funds to revive Moza agriculture

news-image

Maputo - The government and humanitarian organisations face a race against time to revive the farming, fisheries and livestock sectors that have borne the brunt of the Cyclone Idai ravaging Mozambique in recent weeks.
According to experts, for a country where some 80% of the 29 million population is reliant on agriculture, it would be critical to save the remaining animals, rehabilitate damaged land and reboot food production when waters recede.
The violent storms destroyed vast cropland of the staple maize and sorghum on the eve of the April-May harvest and ruined much of the crops - including cassava and beans - when homes were destroyed. Nearly 500,000 hectares were flooded.
There was extensive damage to damage to irrigation, wells and animal watering holes.
United Nation Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) projects most of the losses will be from the Manica and Sofala provinces. These regions account for a quarter of Mozambique’s cereal output.
Hundreds of livestock were lost to the floods.
Fishers also lost their assets and infrastructure, particularly in Beira, the port city worst affected by the floods and is the main port for importing wheat and rice.
FAO has requested an initial US$19 million (R270 million) to assist farmers resume food production, help fishing communities and support livestock owners over the next three months.
This is ahead of the main agricultural season that begins September.
“When the floodwaters recede, it will be crucial that the government, FAO and their partners get in fast,” said Olman Serrano, FAO's representative in Mozambique.
Serrano is also the coordinator of the organisation’s response to the crisis in the country.
“Once we have established how and how much land can be rehabilitated, we will procure and distribute seeds as a matter of urgency so that farmers can plant for the secondary agricultural season, which is starting now, in April,” the FAO envoy said.
Disaster-prone Mozambique was among three countries –alongside neighbouring Malawi and Zimbabwe – devastated by Cyclone Idai.
The official death toll in Mozambique rose to 518 as of April 1.
Daniele Donati, Deputy Director of FAO's Emergency and Resilience division, said climate change contributed to understanding the extreme nature of the cyclone, as well as to the approach towards humanitarian relief.
“It calls on us all to expand the concept of life-saving interventions to include livelihoods protection. Normalizing livelihoods is a first-order priority,” Donati said. – CAJ News

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

Comments

image

Poachers have broken into Botswana’s p Read more...

10 Aug, 2018 at 01:58 PM

image

In a sign that Botswana is likely to cli Read more...

02 Jul, 2018 at 09:26 AM

image

DAR ES SALAAM - DIRECTIVES on online for Read more...

02 Jul, 2018 at 01:24 PM

image

Gaborone - Poachers have broken into Bot Read more...

04 Feb, 2019 at 07:35 AM

image

Gaborone – The Botswana government has Read more...

25 May, 2018 at 02:35 PM

image

Dares Salaam - The Southern African Deve Read more...

20 Aug, 2019 at 12:03 PM

image

Dar es Salaam – Outgoing Southern Afri Read more...

20 Aug, 2019 at 11:58 AM

image

Lusaka - Africa risks veering off course Read more...

20 Aug, 2019 at 11:43 AM

image

Gaborone - The SADC Secretariat convened Read more...

20 Aug, 2019 at 11:41 AM

image

Gaborone - Despite poverty eradication b Read more...

20 Aug, 2019 at 11:26 AM

image

Miss Namibia crowned Read more...

20 Mar, 2018 at 05:50 AM

image

Lusaka - Amid myriad criticisms from soc Read more...

14 Dec, 2018 at 06:28 AM

image

Windhoek - Tanzania has been outperformi Read more...

24 Sep, 2018 at 09:29 AM

image

Heads of state and ministers who travell Read more...

30 Jul, 2018 at 02:01 PM

image

Windhoek - The European Union National I Read more...

01 Apr, 2019 at 12:33 PM